Nov. 16, 2021

A Unique Artifact Goes Virtual: Digitizing NR-1’s Control Room

It’s a challenge museums will always face: fulfilling our missions means collecting more artifacts than we have room to display. The advent of online platforms like social media, websites, and photo-sharing sites has substantially increased virtual access to artifact collections, to the delight of curators and educators. But there’s a catch —

Sept. 3, 2021

Seaman First Class Freddie Falgout: First Military Casualty of World War II

On the evening of August 20, 1937, on the eve of his 21st birthday, Seaman First Class Freddie Falgout was searching for a seat for movie night on the well deck of USS Augusta (CL-31). Augusta had arrived off Shanghai a week earlier, on August 14, 1937, and was moored on the Huangpu River. A humanitarian crisis was underway as hostilities between Chinese and Japanese military forces had resulted in the death of hundreds of civilians, including four Americans, and the ship and her crew were evacuating American citizens and refugees from Shanghai. 

Aug. 30, 2021

A Sept. 11 Pentagon survivor 20 years later

Sept. 11, 2001, is one of those specific moments in time when everyone in the entire generation recalls exactly where they were, much like previous generations knowing where they were for the first reports of the attack on Pearl Harbor or when President John Kennedy was shot.

Aug. 26, 2021

Unique bedsheet in Navy’s collection tells a story of hope

In August of 2020, Naval History and Heritage Command (NHHC) was offered a rather unique and spectacular artifact -- a bedsheet. A common sheet is not very astounding, but the story behind this one explains why this bedsheet is different.

Aug. 20, 2021

Heroism at the Pentagon on Sept. 11, 2001

Twenty years ago, on Sept. 11, 2001, news networks shared live reporting as terrorists launched a series of deadly attacks against targets in America. While the world struggled to come to terms and understand what was happening, there were men and women on the ground struggling to save lives. Among the many stories of heroism from that day is Lt. Cmdr. David Tarantino and Navy Capt. David Thomas who worked together to help multiple people escape the wreckage of the Pentagon.

July 21, 2021

Captain Donnie Cochran: From Farm Boy to Blue Angels Flight Leader

Captain Donnie Cochran was inspired to become a Navy pilot by the military planes flying over his family's farm. His dreams of flight led him to make history as the first African American Blue Angels pilot and flight leader.

June 11, 2021

Perry's Revenge — A Continued Look at the Wreck of an Early 19th-Century Naval Schooner off the Coast of Rhode Island

Naval History and Heritage Command (NHHC) archaeologists collaborated with Naval Undersea Warfare Center (NUWC) engineers during the second half of May 2021 to continue documenting the remains of Oliver Hazard Perry's schooner Revenge, which wrecked off of Watch Hill, Rhode Island in 1811. The team, along with local site discoverers Charles Buffum

June 10, 2021

Birth of the Blues

"It's always about the money" goes the old saying and that was certainly true 75 years ago when Chief of Naval Operations Fleet Admiral Chester W. Nimitz ordered the establishment of an exhibition flight team, the birth of today's famed Blue Angels. Having led the Navy to victory in the Pacific during World War II, Nimitz ascended to the sea

June 10, 2021

Blue Angels Scrapbook

Most people define the Blue Angels by graceful formations soaring in the sky overhead, but life in the Navy Flight Demonstration Squadron is much more than the time spent in the cockpit or on the flight line.  Enjoy the scrapbook of images taken through the years that provides a portrait of the Blue Angels experience.The 1953 team pictured in front

May 6, 2021

Owens v. Brown -- Women Can Now Serve at Sea

On Nov. 10, 1976, Petty Officer Yona Owens and six other women sued the Navy. The women were determined to overturn a 30-year-old federal statute that limited Navy women to shore-duty billets, even though they were trained to work aboard ships. Judge John J. Sirica heard the case April 11, 1978, and July 27, 1978, Judge Sirica ruled that women should be allowed to serve at sea.