Dec. 14, 2015

Nautical Terms and Naval Expressions: The Holiday Edition

Now that the holiday season is officially underway, we thought we'd get into the spirit of the season by taking a look at a few nautical terms and naval expressions that remind us of the holidays. You'll be surprised by the origin of some of these widely used terms and maybe even those you've never heard before.Sugar ReportOur Sailors can't always

Dec. 10, 2015

The Story of a WWII Hero: Honoring an American Fighter Ace and Navy Cross Recipient

On Armistice Day 1943, 25 years after the end of the First World War, then Ensign Charles "Billy" Watts shot down his first enemy aircraft on his first day in combat while flying the Grumman F6F Hellcat.His Navy career started in May 1942, five months after the U.S. joined World War II, when Watts completed his second year of college at East Texas

Dec. 2, 2015

Medal of Honor recipients for Pearl Harbor attack, Dec. 7, 1941 - Part III

(Editors Note: This is the final part of a three part series blog featuring John Finn and other Medal of Honor recipients following the Dec. 7, 1941 attacks on Pearl Harbor. Click here to read Part I and Part II of this blog series.)Listed below are images and the 15 citation for the Sailors who earned the Medal of Honor for actions taken during

Dec. 2, 2015

Pearl Harbor MOH Recipient Recalls "I Could See Their Faces" - Part II

(Editors Note: This is Part II of a three part series blog featuring John Finn and brief information of other Medal of Honor recipients following the Dec. 7, 1941 attacks on Pearl Harbor. Click here to read Part I) On Sept. 15, 1942, Finn received the first Medal of Honor for World War II out of the 15 Medal recipients from the Pearl Harbor attack.

Dec. 2, 2015

Pearl Harbor MOH Recipient Recalls "I Could See Their Faces" - Part 1

(Editors Note: This is Part I of a three part series blog featuring John Finn and brief information of other Medal of Honor recipients following the Dec. 7, 1941 attacks on Pearl Harbor.)December 7, 1941 started like any other Sunday morning for John Finn and his wife. They were at their apartment about a mile from the hangar where Finn, then 32,

Nov. 24, 2015

Sailors Give Thanks While Answering Their Nation's Call to Duty

Commander, Third Fleet (left center) Eats Thanksgiving dinner with the crew of his flagship, USS New Jersey (BB-62), 30 November 1944. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National ArchivesAsk any Sailor and he or she will tell you that being in the Navy means you're deployable with sometimes little more than a moment's

Nov. 24, 2015

Navy Ships Named in Honor of American Indians

November is National American Indian Heritage Month, a time to celebrate the history, heritage, and traditions of American Indians and Alaskan Natives. As we reflect on the accomplishments of the original inhabitants, explorers, and settlers of the United States, we remember a few of the many ships the Navy has named in honor of American Indians,

Nov. 19, 2015

Does the Star Spangled Banner Still Wave on the Moon?

For this month's celebration of Flag Friday, what makes this particular flag stand out is not how old it is, but its location. Because a long time ago, in a dimension beyond earth-bound man, a flag waves boldly where only one other has gone before it - the moon.For most of you reading this blog, few may remember 46 years ago on Nov. 14, 1969, when

Nov. 13, 2015

Navy Legend Vice Adm. Stockdale Led POW Resistance

It's been more than 50 years since then-Cmdr. Stockdale was shot down in Vietnam during his third tour. He had already flown nearly 200 combat missions during the three deployments, earned numerous awards and medals for his leadership and bravery. He led the first bombing mission over North Vietnam in August 1965, and after being shot down and

Nov. 9, 2015

The Navy and the Marine Corps: A Winning Team

As long as navies have taken to the sea, groups of specially trained, seafaring infantry have accompanied them and the United States Navy is no different.Since November 10, 1775, when the Continental Congress approved a resolution to establish two battalions of Marines "able to fight for independence at sea and on shore," the United States Marine